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Press Start Ltd Blog

Press Start Ltd has been serving the East Anglia area since 1996, providing IT Support such as technical helpdesk support, computer support, and consulting to small and medium-sized businesses.

Social Engineering Isn’t Going Away

Social Engineering Isn’t Going Away

When someone starts talking about social engineering, people often get confused. They think we’re talking about cloning. While having two of something you love may not be terrible, the social engineering we routinely cite is much, much worse. Social engineering is the act of using social interactions to get people to make cybersecurity mistakes. Today, we’ll take a look at social engineering and how it can have a negative effect on your business. 

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Think Before You Click: Spotting a Phishing Attempt

Think Before You Click: Spotting a Phishing Attempt

We’ve all caught the obvious spam email, like the message that is clearly bogus, or the offer that is definitely too good to be true.

We’re going to confidently assume none of our readers are getting tricked by Nigerian Princes or getting roped into order virility drugs from an unsolicited email. The real threat comes from the more clever phishing attacks. Let’s take a look.

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UTM is a Strong Solution to Ward Off Hackers

UTM is a Strong Solution to Ward Off Hackers

While there are, of course, amateur hackers who aren’t necessarily well-versed in how to do it, there are other, more professional hackers who “know their stuff,” so to speak. This is similar to just about any kind of profession or industry. You have the hackers who have no idea what they’re talking about, and you have the seasoned professionals who know the ins and outs of how to infiltrate a network. Unlike other industries, however, the cybercrime industry is effective regardless of the proficiency of those involved with it.

If you think about it, this makes sense. It doesn’t matter what kind of threat is installed on your computer. A virus is a virus, and malware is malware. It’s troublesome at best and dangerous or downright threatening at worst. Therefore, if you don’t take network security seriously, you could put the future of your business at risk.

Traditional Hacking Attacks
Many users might look at hacking attacks and think about the more traditional threats. This includes the typical viruses and malware that users associate with suspicious online activity. These threats can have varying effects, but they generally make life difficult for businesses and individuals alike. This is about the extent of the average user’s knowledge regarding hacking attacks. They know they are bad, but they might not know the real ramifications of such attacks.

Emerging Threats
Nowadays, security threats are much more advanced and dangerous, capable of crippling entire networks. Some examples are dedicated spear phishing attacks in which hackers take on the identity of someone close to your organisation, tricking users into downloading the wrong email attachments or sending a wire transfer to an offshore bank account. Other times, it’s installing a backdoor on a network that lets hackers access a network at their leisure. The most dangerous of all ransomware literally locks down your business’ files and demands a ransom for their safe return, putting businesses between a rock and a hard place. Suffice to say, these advanced threats aren’t always identifiable by the average user, and some can’t be identified until it’s far too late and damage has already been done.

Don’t let your business remain in harm’s way any longer. Press Start Ltd can equip your business with solutions that can both prevent hacking attacks and respond to them quickly and efficiently. We do this through the use of a Unified Threat Management (UTM) tool that combines enterprise-level firewalls, antivirus, security blockers, and content filters together to create a comprehensive, preventative, and proactive way to keep your network safe. It’s the best way to approach network security, hands-down.

To learn more about how you can get started with a UTM, give us a call on 01638 603204.

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Lack of Security Training is Putting Businesses at Risk

Lack of Security Training is Putting Businesses at Risk

Let’s say that one of your employees downloads an attachment from an email claiming to be a receipt for an Amazon order or other online shopping outlet. The attachment then proceeds to infect their workstation with a virus or malware. This puts the integrity of your infrastructure at risk all because of a simple mistake. Do you send the employee to cybersecurity training, or do you trust they will learn from the mistake and never repeat it?

This is one of the big choices that you will have to make regarding network security for your business, and it absolutely shouldn’t be made lightly. If you don’t take a stance on network security and employee training, you could be opening your doors to even more threats in the future. What is your business supposed to do in situations like these? After all, you can’t just not take any action at all. Depending on your current security practices, you may need to invest a considerable amount of time and resources into strengthening your resilience against cyberattacks.

It’s important to also keep in mind that you’re not alone in regard to security training for your organisation, according to PhishMe, 91% of cyberattacks are the result of a data breach caused by spear phishing attacks. These include targeted attempts to steal account information from your users or downloading threats that can later infiltrate your business’ infrastructure. Basically, hackers try to use an employee’s lack of knowledge about technology to their advantage, or they make themselves appear as someone more familiar or a known contact within your organisation.

Security Training is On the Rise
As you might guess, cybersecurity training has become a major industry for those who want to take advantage of this lack of knowledge or awareness. Cybersecurity Ventures suggest that the currently $1 billion industry that is cybersecurity training will grow immensely over the next decade, rising to over $10 billion by the year 2027. With more people being connected to some type of smart technology, and even more people entering workforces that demand some sort of knowledge of these developing technologies, it’s never been more important for your workforce to grow more proficient in network security best practices.

Aspects of Security Training
Your business needs to take a comprehensive approach to security training if you hope to keep your organisation secure. Here are some ideas that you should consider for your business’ network security:

  • Identifying phishing emails: Being able to tell when something’s not right is a valuable skill to have, particularly when cleaning out your email inbox. Not everyone can tell when they are being scammed, even when it might seem clear as day. While it’s better to simply make sure that spam stays out of your inbox in general, it’s more difficult when you’re specifically being targeted by spear phishing tactics. Teach employees what they should look for in a legitimate email. And remember, it’s always better to err on the side of caution. If in doubt, ask someone else what they think about it.
  • Password best practices: Ordinarily, we would tell you to always keep secure passwords, which include both upper and lower-case letters, numbers, and special symbols, but these don’t matter if you accidentally give it away to someone claiming to be your technology support. Instead, we want to remind you to never give away sensitive information through email, telephone, or otherwise.
  • Active hands-on security training: Many of the most popular methods of security training have to do with placing your employees in mock scenarios in which they have to respond to a threat. These could include vishing, or voicemail phishing, or even phishing emails themselves, all in an attempt to ensure that they can properly identify and respond to threats.

If your business needs help training its employees, Press Start Ltd can help. To learn more call us on 01638 603204.

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Do You Use 2FA? If So, You’re in the Minority

Do You Use 2FA? If So, You’re in the Minority

Two-factor authentication, also known as 2FA, is a very beneficial addition to consider for your cybersecurity. However, a research study unearthed a few surprising takeaways that indicate that 2FA may not be adopted as much as one might expect it to be.

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Hackers Target Major Sporting Events

Hackers Target Major Sporting Events

There are literally billions of sports fans in the world, and the popularity of these events brings in big money; and big money typically attracts hackers. Using all types of methods, there has been a history of hacking in almost every sport. Today, we take a look at some of the most famous hacks that have shaken up the sports world.

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The IoT Can Be Very Useful, but Also Risky

The IoT Can Be Very Useful, but Also Risky

You might be surprised to hear how the scope of the Internet of Things has increased over the past few years. These connected devices are all over the place. In order to ensure that your business isn’t affected in a negative way by these IoT devices, you’ll need to consider the many risks and how you will respond to them.

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Cybersecurity Industry Update

Cybersecurity Industry Update

2018 will see many changes to the way that businesses manage security, but unlike 2017, when many companies suffered from large high-profile data breaches, the trends aren’t as obvious as you might think. We’ll go over some of the potential trends we could see as a result of 2018’s security developments and why they matter to your business.

Ransomware Will Continue to Be an Issue
While ransomware isn’t as high-profile of a threat as it has been in the past, it still continues to be a problem that could create dangerous situations for your business. Just the threat of it being out there is enough to make the average business question their security. Unfortunately, ransomware is one of the more difficult threats to protect your business from, as it can make its way into your office through a tricky medium--Internet of Things devices.

IoT devices are on the rise even today, and with so many devices being connected to the Internet, it’s inevitable that one of them will become infected by some type of malware (perhaps even ransomware) and bring it to your office, where it can populate your network. To secure your network from IoT devices, you’ll have to have a discussion with your team members about data access best practices, as well as mobile device practices that minimise their likelihood of exposing themselves to potential threats. You can also round out your network security by implementing a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy for your business in which employees who want to use their personal devices for work purposes must subscribe to specific practices, including device monitoring, remote wiping, and more.

Artificial Intelligence Will Plague Businesses
Artificial intelligence has been used by security professionals to make considerable leaps and bounds in network security, but it’s thought that in the near future, hackers will be able to leverage it to their own nefarious ends. With security software constantly learning and adapting to specific scenarios, it makes sense that in order to combat these types of protective solutions, hackers would want threats that can do the same.

A.I. can be used to collect information on specific businesses from all parts of the Internet, be it support websites, directories, and so much more. Artificial intelligence threats can then use this information to methodically create a targeted attempt at breaking down your organisation’s defences. If you’re not concerned about the future of A.I. in regard to cyber threats, you should be, as it represents a dangerous trend toward intelligent threats undermining the best efforts by security professionals at keeping up with the industry.

GDPR Will Shake Things Up
As of this past May, the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR, is in full effect. While this does aim to help protect users’ data privacy, it presents some complications for businesses. Since these organisations aren’t allowed to store information (like cookies) without the user’s consent, it’s expected that at least a couple of businesses will fail to adhere to these new regulations.

According to Forrester, it’s expected that 80% of businesses will fail to comply with these new regulations. The reasoning, however, is a bit odd. 50% of these organisations will actually choose not to comply, citing the reason as the fact that actually complying with these new guidelines will cost more than the fines associated with failure. Whatever the case, it’s likely that this will have an impact on user security and data privacy in the future.

Don’t let your business fall behind the times in terms of network security. To learn more about how you can protect your business, reach out to us at 01638 603204.

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Has the Internet of Things Outpaced Network Security?

Has the Internet of Things Outpaced Network Security?

The Internet of Things is constantly changing and evolving, but this also means that it might be growing a bit too fast for its own good. So many devices these days have connectivity that it’s difficult to keep your business secure from them. We’ll discuss whether or not the Internet of Things is outpacing the efforts of security organizations and businesses, as well as what you can do to make sure that your business doesn’t fall victim to it.

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Does Outsourcing Your Business’ Network Security Make Sense?

Does Outsourcing Your Business’ Network Security Make Sense?

Managed service is a relatively new concept, but that doesn’t mean that the industry hasn’t grown rapidly. You can now get a managed service contract for your household appliances and one for your car. The truth is that not having access to a large cache of capital needed to make proactive investment used to be the bane of the small business. The service model has changed that completely. It has certainly revolutionised the IT deployment and support models. In fact, from hardware support to cloud computing, there are service options for most IT products. This month, we will take a long look at the Managed Security Service Provider (MSSP), and the circumstances that need to happen to gain value from one.

What is a Managed Security Service Provider?
You know how it seems like every other day there is a major data breach, network takedown, or infiltration broadcast on the evening news? Companies of high repute, including Disney, Yahoo, Sony, Anthem, Target, Equifax, and a laundry list of others have had major data breaches that have exposed hundreds-of-thousands-to-billions of users’ information. As a result, you’ve seen companies start up with one goal in mind: to mitigate detrimental circumstances that surround the growing use of IT.

Like many of other IT service providers, the first companies to utilise these services were larger enterprises with tens of thousands of employees. Given that they tend to have the most complex environments and the financial resources to afford the often-pricey services MSSPs provide, it isn’t a big surprise that a lot of the best practices used in network security were developed by IT technicians solving enterprise-level problems for enterprise-level businesses. After strategically moving into the mid-market over the past few years, MSSPs have increased enough in number to start selling their brand of managed security to small and medium-sized businesses.

It’s not really news that SMBs have suffered a disproportionate percentage of hackers’ ire recently. The Verizon Data Breach Investigation report in 2016 found that two-out-of-every-three of the 855 reported data breach incidents happened to businesses that employed between 11-and-100 employees. Demand, it seems, has allowed SMBs access to better outsourced security services.

What Does an MSSP Do?
The MSSP, especially ones that conduct business in the SMB market, traditionally are just managed service providers that extend a routine agreement to one that is a little more device-sensitive. Typically MSSPs are tasked with two basic things. First, they are responsible for the monitoring and management of an organisation’s network to ensure that security threats are mitigated. Secondly, they manage device deployment. Users are less apt to be on point about security initiatives so by having people there managing the devices that connect to your organisation’s network, you position someone between endpoints and hacker paydirt: the data on your central servers.

Of course, for businesses that function inside the various industries that require very specific security practices, such as healthcare, retail, and professional services, the benefits an MSSP provide is that they have a lot of experience dealing with data, infrastructure, and regulations in those specific industries. For those companies that are under strict compliance regulations, or those that work with them, having a service in place that allows for comprehensive security service and thorough reporting is ideal. Specifically, some services an MSSP would offer include:

  • Compliance assurance
  • Intrusion detection
  • Managed firewall
  • Malware elimination
  • Pen testing
  • Virtual private networks
  • Vulnerability scanning

Are the Costs Worth It?
There are two schools of thought to this. The first is that if your business is inundated with security problems, there is a good chance that you will deal with data loss, downtime, and other situations that could make it increasingly difficult to create positive revenue positions. If that is your current position, paying the extra money for an outsourced security provider will pay for itself. After all, with the myriad of entities out there actively looking to get into your network; or, more specifically looking to get ahold of the personally identifiable, financial, or medical information that you depend on, maintaining a high level of network security is paramount to any success your organisation is going to have.

The second position is that the average coverage of a small business will cost a few thousand dollars per month, and if you already have IT personnel on staff, or you pay a managed service provider like Press Start Ltd for network monitoring and patch management, it could put your organisation behind before it even has a chance to create any revenue. If you have sustained a secure network and infrastructure with the security resources you have in place, adding the extra layer of security monitoring, while it couldn’t hurt your security position, may hurt your financial position.

Really, it comes down to your needs. For the organisation that deals in information that hackers would target, an outsourced MSSP contract may be just the thing you need to ensure airtight security. However, if your company functions fine without the extra security, whether it’s because the information you have is safe enough, or because the data you possess isn’t necessarily what hackers are looking for, you can probably forgo the expense as long as you are diligent about how you manage, share, and store data.

At Press Start Ltd, we have found success creating and managing storage and computing infrastructures that are reliable and keep data secure. If you would like more information about managed security services, or if you just want to talk to us about the state of your network and endpoint security, call us today on 01638 603204.

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Cybersecurity Requires Flexibility to Changes

Cybersecurity Requires Flexibility to Changes

Security is always changing due to the volatility of online threats and vulnerabilities. Things have changed so much over the past decade that solutions that worked back then are so outdated that they put your business at risk today. This brings into question what you should expect in the years to come. What are some of the threats that your business can expect to face in the future?

For reference, this information is from a study performed by Cisco. The study references the findings of 3,600 data security professionals from organisations such as Talos and others from all over the world.

Malware Has Grown More Autonomous
Early types of malware relied heavily on the user actually clicking on a link or downloading an attachment to install itself on their computer. Nowadays, malware doesn’t take the risk that the victim will know better than to click on a link or download something bad. Instead, a ransomware might be more network-based, meaning that all it takes is a simple mistake to spread to your entire infrastructure. Cisco suspects that this type of threat could potentially grow so widespread that it could take over the Internet.

Ransomware Is About More Than Just Money
Ransomware used to be all about making money and disrupting operations. It was a way to make money to fund further hacking attacks against even more victims. People would pay up because they were too scared to imagine losing their data. Trends are showing that hackers are increasingly more interested not in the financial side of ransomware, but with the destruction of businesses. Ransomware is being actively used by criminals to put an end to any business unfortunate enough to be hit by it.

Threats Are Avoiding Detection More Effectively
Ultimately, any online threat’s level of danger is equivalent to how easy it is to hide. The easier it hides, the more dangerous it can be. Ransomware can now hide in encrypted traffic to make itself much harder to detect. It can even use cloud-based applications and services to implement a command and control attack, all hidden within normal traffic.

Watch Out for Internet of Things Devices
The Internet of Things, a large collection of connected devices that all perform various functions has grown at a considerable rate. Since Internet of Things devices are difficult to patch properly, they can provide backdoor access to an infrastructure. Since many IoT endpoints aren’t secured properly, your company network could potentially be opened up to all kinds of threats.

Security changes every day, but the one thing that never changes is that Press Start Ltd can help your business secure its infrastructure. To learn more, call us on 01638 603204.

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Three Give-Aways that Your Security Approach Needs a Change

Three Give-Aways that Your Security Approach Needs a Change

It only makes sense that you would want only the best security for your organisation. It’s natural to want to eliminate risk entirely. However, this simply is not a realistic viewpoint to take where your security is concerned and it can even contribute to greater security issues as a company holds out for the best solution.

This is no way to do business, but it can be hard to identify if you, yourself, are actually trying to bite off more than you can chew. To help, here are three signs that you are actually hurting your company and its security by trying too much and focusing on the wrong things.

1. Setting Standards Too High
Of course there needs to be organisational standards where security is concerned. However, it is important to recognise that ‘perfection’ simply isn’t going to be attainable. Many companies will be committed to their ideal vision of a solution to the point that, until that golden standard is found in reality, they won’t implement what is seen as an inferior option, leaving themselves completely vulnerable. What’s worse, some of these companies will actively find issues with an entirely workable solution, prolonging the process.

This can have the added ill effect of creating organisational paralysis among the workforce. Operational paralysis is simply the lack of movement toward change, improvement and advancement in a business, due to an impression among the staff that any action will ultimately fail. This makes it particularly difficult to enact any change, whether it’s to your security or otherwise, as your staff will not be motivated to stick to it.

2. Waiting For The Perfect Storm
Many business owners have the tendency to find any reason to wait before starting a project of any kind, including a security initiative. They might want more data to support their proposed strategy, or want another project to be wrapped and put to bed, or want more money or time to commit to it. Any of these reasons may keep them from acting, or from even entertaining an idea.

The thing is, there will never be the perfect time to start a project and something or other will always be there to get in the way and create friction. However, when it concerns something as important as security, you need to get something workable in place before the worst happens. After all, you can always continue to improve upon things.

3. Lack of Priorities
Again, it is only natural to want to be prepared for everything, but this too often translates into a company spreading themselves thin and not really being prepared for anything. Furthermore, there may just not be the resources available to reinforce a company against all threats at once. In cases like these, it is only too easy to overestimate the risk of some events. To counter this, there needs to be a frank and pragmatic look at your particular situation.

For example, a business located in a dry, arid area is far more likely to experience a fire than they are a flood. Therefore, it statistically makes more sense to prepare for a fire first and wait until a little later to make the preparations for the flood. Weighing your security risks should follow the same process, which requires a resistance to the knee-jerk reaction to fix everything immediately.

While maintaining your IT security is obviously an important task, it is equally important to strategise your approach to this maintenance. Press Start Ltd can help you handle it. Call 01638 603204 for more information today.

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Ransomware Presents Big Risks

Ransomware Presents Big Risks

The business world has been presented a lot of threats recently and perhaps one of the most notable is ransomware. The reason it has become so notorious is because it’s incredibly difficult to remove from a system and the way that it spreads is constantly changing and adapting to further its influence. How can your business prepare against such a volatile threat? It all starts by remaining mindful of how ransomware spreads.

First, we want to offer a little primer of ransomware in the business environment. Ransomware essentially encrypts files found on your organisation’s network, locking them down so that they can’t be accessed or used by your company. With this in mind, it’s no surprise that ransomware is commonly used to cripple businesses and scare them into acting against their best interest. If the user doesn’t pay the ransom demanded of them, they could potentially lose all of their data for good. However, what the hacker doesn’t tell you is that there is no guarantee that they will give you the encryption key, even if you pay them the ransom.

You’re forced to make a difficult decision; pay up and further fund future ransomware campaigns, or hope for the best by working with cybersecurity professionals to remove the ransomware from your devices. Neither are particularly charming options, especially since nothing can be guaranteed to work.

Ransomware mostly spreads through the use of spam and phishing attacks. Since spam messages can be dispatched to countless targets easily enough, it’s simple to ensnare several users or organisations at once. As ransomware grew in popularity and efficiency, however, it began being distributed in much more dangerous ways. Phishing attacks that are much more targeted than your average spam attack allow hackers to fool even the most cautious user. In particular, these attacks are made toward businesses, who tend to value data much more than the average user, simply because there’s a lot more at stake.

If you don’t know what to look for, phishing attacks can be quite difficult to identify, and they hold the potential to cause catastrophic consequences for your organisation. Therefore, your staff should be able to identify and respond to ransomware while mitigating the threat. The potential of ransomware in the future is untold and holds many dangers. Hackers have begun to find new ways to take advantage of and distribute ransomware. Ransomware can be purchased on the black market and it’s much more accessible to even small-fry hackers. How will your business be able to protect itself from these threats?

The first step toward securing your business is being wary of how to prevent ransomware from rooting itself in your business infrastructure in the first place. Never trust suspicious messages in your inbox and always double check who the sender is whenever possible. Ransomware likes to spread through attachments, like supposed resumes, bank statements and other information. Never click on links or download attachments until you know they are legitimate.

Furthermore, you need to have a worst-case scenario in place by implementing a backup and disaster recovery solution. This allows you to restore data from a point before the ransomware struck your business. This is the only way that you can escape from a ransomware strike relatively unscathed. Press Start Ltd can help you implement security solutions and data backup to ensure maximum survivability in the event of a ransomware attack. To learn more, reach out to us at 01638 603204.

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Three of the Most Pressing Variables to Keep Your Network Secure in 2018

Three of the Most Pressing Variables to Keep Your Network Secure in 2018

Maintaining network security for a small business has been known to be a major challenge, but not for a lack of effort. Due to the unique budget restraints and workforce troubles that are associated with a smaller organisation, security is known to suffer considerably for a number of reasons. On top of worrying about network security maintenance, you need to worry about the many threats that continue to evolve with each and every passing day. How will you keep your business assets secure in 2018?

The following comes from the Information Security Forum, a non-profit that takes an analytical approach to the various network security risks in an annual report called Threat Horizon. By taking a deep dive into the various cyber threats to your organization, you can better prepare your company for the future. Here are three of the biggest threats to your business’s network security in 2018.

The More Technology, the More Risk
It’s only natural that the more technology your business implements, the more trouble you will have with maintaining security. The problem with this is that your business relies on technology in at least some capacity and the more you have, the more dependent you are on it. In a world filled with connected technology, there are even more threats that your organisation needs to consider in 2018.

Take, for example, the internet of Things and Bring Your Own Device. These trends and developments add more devices than ever before to your business’ network. The internet of Things includes any connected devices that might not normally be connected to the internet, including smart appliances. This gives your organisation more potential outlets for attacks from external threats and companies that collect information could potentially sell it to gain a profit off of your device usage (depending on terms and conditions). Furthermore, your employees bringing their own devices to the workplace adds even more access points that hackers can take advantage of. Without proper security practices and a dedicated training platform you can’t hope to protect your business in 2018. You need to implement a BYOD policy now before your employees accidentally expose sensitive information through their smart devices.

Protection Can Be Compromised
While security may not have been a major priority for board members or business executives in the past, in light of the massive data breaches that happen on a regular basis, more and more decision makers are moving security to the top of the priority list. Unfortunately, these are also the same people who want to see immediate results, something that any major implementation may take time to yield. When such an important initiative is rushed into producing results, these results can be skewed and potentially cause the organisation to do the exact opposite of what they should do.

While vulnerabilities are discovered regularly by security researchers, it’s becoming a regular event that they are held back from going public with the findings by legal teams. Even though these findings would improve security, legal action is often threatened against the researching party. Despite a cooperative effort being in the best interests of consumers, the ISF believes that this trend will only increase over the next two years, leaving consumers with software products filled to the brim with vulnerabilities that could have been resolved otherwise. A more lucrative and beneficial route would be to offer financial compensation (like Google’s Project Zero initiative) to those who can successfully discover threats and vulnerabilities in software solutions.

Governments Are Taking Notice of Security Issues
New technologies generally attract the attention of any authority figures in the world, including police organisations and governments. Governments will see new technologies and services, wondering how they will need to get involved with companies that handle sensitive information, or against those that make threats to the security of the worldwide environment (think cyber terrorism). The ISF believes that in the next two years, governments will use these new developments as reason to introduce new legislation allowing for more intervention in technological advances.

In particular, the ISF sees a future where governments will understand the technology more than they will understand the political or social implications of it. This leads to government policies and legislation being implemented in a shoddy manner that may not necessarily be the best solution to the problems at hand. For example, take a look at companies that rely on the cloud. Data regulations and policies can be implemented, but if they aren’t enough to secure the data, what’s the point of the legislation in the first place?

Regarding cyber criminals, consider the fact that most of them don’t target companies or information housed in their home countries. This leads to jurisdictional complications and a lack of cooperation between agencies responsible for administering punishment to these criminals. Criminals know that this is the case, so if you want to make sure that they have the minimum effect on your business’ data infrastructure, start with preventative solutions that make it so you don’t have to pursue them past your country’s border, as there is no consistency with multi-national policing to fall back on.

In order to ensure that your business can survive in the cutthroat future where the latest security threats can punch holes in your organisation’s defences, you have to take preventative measures now before it’s too late. Press Start Ltd can equip your business with the proper security tools necessary to secure your organisation’s future. To learn more, call us on 01638 603204.

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